Top 5 Myths About Coyotes featured image

More and more people are routinely hearing coyotes yip, bark, and howl in their backyards in urban and suburban settings. In fact, coyote sounds have become increasingly more common in a wide range of urban landscapes. With that, we’ll take a look at the top five myths about coyotes in today’s post to give you a better understanding of this unique animal.

At Wildlife Removal Services, we provide professional and humane animal control services to clients in San Diego, Temecula, and Orange County. From rats and raccoons to opossums, snakes, coyotes, and more be sure to contact us to learn more about what we can offer, and get a free quote on our services.

Myth

Coyotes vocalize to organize hunts or celebrate their kills.

Fact

Studies show that vocalizing is mostly done by the Alpha male and female and is a form of communication between animals. Coyotes are opportunistic scavengers and hunters, which means they will eat anything they can capture or find. They prefer to eat wild animals but will eat garbage, poultry, pet food, and pets, primarily cats. They will occasionally kill domestic dogs or foxes if they view them as a territorial invader. While coyotes hunt mostly at night, they are also known to hunt during the day if undisturbed.

Myth

Coyotes are vicious predators who routinely harass humans and their companion animals.

Fact

While attacks do occur, in reality, they’re quite rare, considering all of the opportunities coyotes actually have to interact with humans and domestic animals. Coyotes were once omnivores limited by the grassland fauna of rabbits, mice, and insects. With the loss of their habitat, they now opportunistically consume everything from small mammals and birds to livestock and pets, fruits and vegetables, carrion, and garbage.

Myth

Coyotes lure dogs to their death.

Fact

Loose dogs often chase coyotes who frequently have family members in the area. For a dog, it’s mostly about the fun of the chase. Unfortunately, for coyotes, it’s about life and death, especially if they have pups. Since coyotes are family-oriented, they do not use their family members to bait or lure other animals. When a free-roaming dog chases and harasses a coyote, the coyote will flee to the safety of family members.

Myth

Coyotes shouldn’t be seen in the daytime and if they are, the animal may be rabid.

Fact

When living in close proximity to humans, coyotes tend to be nocturnal, but they can also be active in the early morning and at sunset. Coyotes that live in areas with little-to-no human activity will likely hunt during the day. If they have a litter of pups, however, coyotes might have to hunt around the clock. Coyotes are rarely reported as a rabid wildlife species. Coyotes are affected by a wide variety of parasites and diseases, including ticks, fleas, intestinal worms, and heartworms. They may also be infected with canine distemper, parvovirus, and mange. While susceptible to rabies, they are not frequent carriers of the “raccoon” or mid-Atlantic strain of the virus.

Myth

Coyotes abandon their pups.

Fact

Coyotes are generally monogamous and maintain pair bonds that can last for several years. They are devoted and protective parents and do not abandon their young. During infancy, pups depend on their mother’s milk, which means that if she is killed, the pups will perish. Both parents care for their young, frequently with the help of older offspring.

Myth

A yipping coyote means it has killed something.

Fact

The coyote is a very vocal animal with a varied repertoire of calls. It uses a long howl to report its location, short barks to warn of danger, yips when reuniting with pack members, growls when establishing dominance, whines and whimpers when bonding, and high-pitched barks to summon pups. Coyotes do not advertise their food sources. Just as you wouldn’t consider trying to sing with your mouth full of food, neither do coyotes.

Myth

Coyotes stalk people.

Fact

Coyotes are aware of everything in their territory. When raising families, coyotes will escort or shadow visitors traveling through shared spaces to make sure they leave the area. Often misinterpreted as being “bold” or “brazen”, a curious coyote may stop and watch visitors to assess any threats to his or her family. It is important to note that a coyote who has been fed by people may exhibit demand behavior. For this reason, it’s important to never feed a coyote.

Animal Control Services in San Diego

If you think you have a coyote problem in your backyard or home, don’t hesitate to reach out to the professionals at Wildlife Removal Services in San Diego. We provide humane animal control to ensure your health and safety. Contact us today for a free quote.